History of Science & Tech: Updates!

We are very excited to share some of the progress we have made with the first volume of The History of Applied Science and Technology Open Textbook. In the past few months, we have managed to secure contributors from institutions across North America, Europe and Africa for chapters ranging from the Ancient World to the Medieval Period.

Lead editor Danielle Mead Skjelver of the University of Maryland and University of North Dakota is delighted at the impact this textbook will have on students. She says,

“In the open access ecosystem, The History of Applied Science & Technology Textbook Project is well underway in producing a resource to fill a need that is as yet unmet. We are excited to contribute to the growing number of open access Humanities textbooks!”

This first volume should be available for adoption as early as January 2018. We are grateful for the enthusiastic response and support from members of the Rebus Community, and elsewhere.

What’s Next? Volume II!

Moving forward, we are looking for contributors for the second volume of the book. This project was conceived as a wide-ranging survey text that would provide instructors with content structured around a narrative focused on human transformation across time and geographic space. Volume II will encompass the following chapters:

  • The Medieval Period (500 to 1400 CE) — China
  • The Remarkable Fifteenth Century (1400-1500)
  • The Early Modern Period (1500-1600) — Europe Phase I: Breakthroughs in Scientific Thought & Technological Application
  • The Early Modern Period (1500-1750) — Global Technologies
  • The Early Modern Period (1600-1750) — Europe Phase II: The New Science of the Seventeenth Century & the Enlightenment

Interested in contributing to one of these chapters? We’re looking for ~1000 word section contributions on a range of topics. We invite you to sign up via our forum, or claim (or suggest!) your section in the more comprehensive Table of Contents.

If you’d rather contribute time as a proofreader, reviewer, or something else, let us know on the forum! At Rebus, we believe that collaborative publishing is the model for the future, and welcome faculty, students, and other participants to work together to build this new model.

Office Hours Recap & Video: Accessibility in Open Textbooks

Are you a professor, librarian, or staff member looking for ways to prioritize accessibility in OER? This month’s Office Hours session on best practices for accessibility in open textbooks will help you do just that! Watch the video recording, or read a recap.


Accessibility in Open Textbooks was the subject of this month’s Office Hours, organized by Rebus Community and the Open Textbook Network.

Watch the video, or read a recap of this session below.

Hugh McGuire of Rebus Community introduced the guest speakers, who included Josie Gray, BCcampus; Krista Greear, University of Washington; Jess Mitchell, OCAD University; and Michelle Reed, University of Texas at Arlington Libraries. Each speaker presented a five-minute perspective on accessibility that included how they make open content accessible at their institution.

Josie Gray is an Open Textbook accessibility editor with BCcampus. She performs post-publication edits to open textbooks to ensure the content conforms to Web accessibility guidelines. Josie uses a screen reader, which uses markup of a web page to make things accessible to non-sighted users, to test the accessibility of the textbooks. She stresses that fluency in HTML is not needed to make open content accessible, especially in Pressbooks. She mentioned some accessibility best practices for markup, including adding link text, using table headers, adding captions and alt tags for images, and including long descriptions for images that would need this detail to understand if you weren’t able to see them. Josie advised authors to avoid conveying information through colour. She suggested BCcampus’ Accessibility Toolkit as a good starting point for those new to thinking about basic best practices to implement for accessibility.

Jess Mitchell, senior manager of research and design at IDRC, OCAD University, said there are a number of ways to make content accessible, including the best practices Josie mentioned. Jess pushed participants to go beyond checklists, and also think about the ecosystem that is required to make a piece of content accessible. “We want to start to think about pedagogically, how do you think about presenting materials in a way that can make them accessible.” She also talked about creating not just accessible materials, but accessible materials that “create an opportunity of discovery for the learner.”

Michelle Reed is an open education librarian from University of Texas at Arlington Libraries. She encouraged attendees to think of ways to prioritize accessibility in their institutions. Michelle said she aspires to limit or eliminate the need for commercial textbook remediation by making high-quality OER alternatives that are innately accessible. She mentioned that the use of materials remediated to be accessible is limited to students with a registered disability, when in fact making content more accessible and multi-modal could benefit all students.

Krista Greear is the assistant director for disability resources for students at the University of Washington. She has been working to make course materials accessible for the past five years. Krista works mainly with the remediation side of things, and manages a unit that provides closed captioning for course videos and other support for students with disabilities. “Accessibility is really giving students with disabilities the same right to succeed or fail as any other student,” she said. She talked about creating materials or retrofitting materials to be device agnostic, ability agnostic, and access to technology agnostic–or at least materials that can be easily turned into something that is readily usable by anyone. Krista reminded us about the various contexts in which students might use open textbooks, such as reading a textbook on the bus, or on a mobile device, and how these environments should be taken into consideration during their production. She said she believes the line between video and document content formats will blur further as textbooks become more interactive. Krista also advocated for accessibility practitioners to work alongside faculty and content creators in order to make accessibility possible as materials are created, not after the fact.

Karen Lauritsen of the Open Textbook Network mentioned that OTN had accessibility resources available in the recently released Authoring Open Textbooks Guide.

Hugh invited participants to join the Rebus Community Working Group on Accessibility to collectively build both checklists for accessibility and ways to integrate best practices into the authoring process.

Participants wanted to know whether speakers had a sample intake form with accessibility questions that professors/instructional designers could use when authoring an open textbook–something that would help authors think about accessibility considerations as they create content. Karen shared the intake form from the Authoring Guide, but cautioned that it may need revising for individual circumstances.

Participants talked about accessibility and interactive STEM content, especially for translating interactive visual models from an HTML5 canvas to a tactile learning experience. Jess pointed towards PhET, and Krista suggested the ITACCESS group and the ATHEN listserv as additional resources. Other questions were about accessible design in Google Docs – Grackle came up as a popular resource – and the community response to efforts to make OERs accessible. Our special guests agreed unanimously that response was positive, while they mentioned that convincing professors to devote time to remediating documents or recruiting volunteers was challenging.

Hugh inquired how much time our guests spent remediating textbooks. Michelle ran some numbers, and found that from April 1 to date, she and her students had spent 1,800 hours remediating 109 textbooks and 100 hours captioning videos. She said that it takes them 100 pages/hr to remediate non-STEM materials, while it takes 10 pages/hr to remediate STEM content. Michelle also stressed that due to copyright and funding restrictions, their work is not shareable with other universities. (So if another student needs the same textbook remediated, their institution would have to start from scratch, a key reason why she said accessibility should be built into textbooks from the get-go.)

The Rebus Working Group will continue the conversation around accessibility. Front of mind will be ways to make open textbooks accessible in the creation process and educate authors/faculty and institutions about why this matters. Interested in taking part? Join the Working Group on Accessibility.

July Office Hours: Keeping Open Textbooks Up to Date

Open Textbook Network & Rebus Community Host Office Hours: Keeping Open Textbooks Up to Date

Guest Speakers: Lauri Aesoph, BCcampus; Shane Nackerud, University of Minnesota Libraries; Kristen Munger, SUNY Oswego

Wednesday, July 26, 2 p.m. EST

RSVP

Technology enables open textbooks to become living documents with longer lifespans than traditionally published textbooks. With that in mind, how do we care for open textbooks in the long term? How do we systematically ensure that new editions are created and that instructors know up-to-date versions are available? This session will discuss some of the challenges and opportunities of maintaining open textbooks.

RSVP for the session. Click https://zoom.us/j/382553244 to join the session day of. (Note that the session will be recorded.)

If you have any questions, or have difficulty entering the call, email us at contact@rebus.community.

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Peer Review Working Group: Next Steps

Peer review is critical for the acceptance of open textbooks by the wider world. Perceptions of uncertain quality of open textbooks is often cited as a barrier to adoption. Good, transparent review processes will help solve this problem.

While many open textbooks are comprehensively reviewed, there is currently no accepted standard or process for review.

We’ve put together a Peer Review Working Group to help the Open Textbook community come together to develop a clear approach to review. (Would you like to join us? Go here!)

We’ve currently got around 20 members in this group, from as many institutions, including: the Open Textbook Network, OpenStax, SUNY, Oregon State, and Ryerson University. You can find a recap of our first meeting (including the full video) here.

During this meeting, we identified a number of challenges for reviewing Open Textbooks, and our group hopes to provide some solutions, with subgroups focusing on the following issues.

Please join us if you think you can help us figure out smart approaches to reviewing Open Textbooks.

Group 1: Open Textbook Review Board
The Rebus Community has proposed to create a review board that can been leveraged to help find reviewers for open textbooks. Members of the board will be contacted when a book becomes available for review and make efforts within and possibly beyond their institutions to find volunteers. This group will define and help to launch the board. Join Group 1 here.

Group 2: Defining Categories of Review
This group will work to define the purpose and structure of the different kinds of review that could be valuable to an open textbook. They will also help guide the development of dedicated tools and resources for each kind of review. Join Group 2 here.

Group 3: Environmental Scan of Peer Review Tools, Processes & Research
This group will conduct a scan of the existing peer review market in order to inform the development of new review processes. Join Group 3 here.

Group 4: Creating Standard Markers for OT Review
This group will discuss creating a standardised system to clearly identify the kinds of review that any given textbook has undergone. This will link to the work of group 2, who are defining different categories of review. Join Group 4 here.

Group 5: Recognition for Reviewers
This group will discuss ideas of how to recognise and reward reviewer contributions. This may eventually feed into the creation of something similar to the Mozilla Contributorship Badges project, recognising all kinds of participation in open textbook projects, including peer review. Join Group 5 here.

Signup for the groups will stay open, but we encourage you to join by May 20 so we can start moving forward on each of them.

Office Hours Recap & Video: OER Workflows for Open Textbooks

In this month’s Office Hours, organized by Rebus Community and the Open Textbook Network, special guests and participants discussed their experiences with OER workflows.

Watch the video or read a recap of the session below.

Guests included Allison Brown, SUNY Geneseo; Rebel Cummings-Sauls, Kansas State University; Billy Meinke, University of Hawaii; and Anthony Palmiotto, OpenStax.

Karen Lauritsen of the Open Textbook Network introduced this month’s guests, asking them to briefly describe the processes they use when making open textbooks.

Billy Meinke, an OER technologist at UHawaii, works with faculty at his institution to shepherd them through the process of creating OERs. He shared an OER workflow diagram that he created, which provides a high-level view of the major steps involved in adopting and adapting an OER: priming, pre-production, design, development, and publishing. In order to make for more efficient workflows, Billy said, OER training at all UHawaii campuses also now includes Pressbooks training, to make individuals comfortable with the software they use for book production.  

Rebel Cummings-Sauls is the director for the Centre for Advancement of Digital Scholarship at Kansas State University and specializes in copyright and Open Access. KSU provides grant funding for faculty to create open access textbooks and resources. Rebel said KSU prefers faculty to complete the resources commissioned within a year, though projects can take longer. Payment is one incentive she uses to keep projects on track. Rebel mentioned that one factor that can cause delays is that faculty members often want more rounds of private feedback on their textbook before it goes public.

Anthony Palmiotto is the editorial director at OpenStax, which creates open textbooks that are competitive with market-leading texts for specific college courses and makes them available free on the OpenStax website, generally under CC BY licenses. The OpenStax workflow begins with preparation: collecting market research, competitive benchmarking, educational research, length requirements, and so on. OpenStax involves faculty in this process, reaching out to them via surveys and at conferences. Often those who get involved in this way will continue to work on the project in later stages. OpenStax selects a team of faculty to work on the book as authors and reviewers. Later stages of production include revisions, originality checking, art rendering, fact checking and accessibility checks, and XML production. Anthony said OpenStax books typically take 18 months to 2 years to reach completion.

Allison Brown joined us from OpenSUNY, and described the production process for SUNY’s open textbooks. After a manuscript has been received, the workflow includes peer review, author revisions, copy editing, typesetting, proofreading, and finally publication. She said pain points included transitions (when a manuscript moves between collaborators such as writers and editors; or across platforms, such as from Word to Pressbooks) and copy editing. She said it’s important to forewarn authors of the expectations of them post-copy editing. To make the workflow more manageable, OpenSUNY conducts a thorough needs assessment of each manuscript prior to production. Allison says one common thread that ensures successful book projects is healthy communication with authors. She is transparent with authors, staff and freelancers, and clearly outlines expectations at various stages of the production process. She also mentioned the importance of someone acting as project manager to ensure projects stay on track.

The ensuing discussion touched upon a number of topics. Among these, the group discussed how to involve students in beta use and testing of books post-publication. Rebel said her institution obtains feedback on the books through several methods–evaluations, surveys, quizzes and forms from students whose faculty use the text in their class–and that they receive the bulk of student feedback and input in the first semester of a book’s use. Participants asked how OpenStax operationalizes originality checks and incorporates ancillary resources. Anthony said they use iThenticate and conduct spot checks of sections of copy with Google. Participants asked whether proofreading, copy editing, and design is assigned to freelancers or done in-house. Allison and Rebel both said that it varies with project, with Allison adding that she sometimes outsources cover design to students. One of the major themes that came out of this discussion was the importance of educating faculty and students about CC licenses and their implications, as well as copyright and fair use guidelines. New Prairie Press’ Permission to Publish was shared as a resource. 

There was a lot of talk regarding guidelines for peer review and ways to standardize the review process for open textbooks. Many resources were shared, including Rebus’ Peer Review Working Group, OTN’s chapter on Peer Review in their Guide to Authoring Open Textbooks, OpenSUNY’s guidelines, OpenUMN’s rubric, and UHawaii’s guide. The Rebus working group on Peer Review will delve further into these issues (and hopefully formalize some best practices), and we encourage you to join!

If you have anything more to add to these discussions, please join the Rebus Community Forum to continue the conversation. 

A transcript of this Office Hours is available here.

Additional Resources:

Peer Review Working Group Recap

Peer review is an integral component of traditional academic publishing, but in the world of open textbooks, there is currently no common standard for reviewing in open textbooks. To address this need, Rebus Community has formed a working group to explore peer review for open textbooks. The group held its first meeting May 3 to discuss how the community of open textbook practitioners could build a coherent strategy and best practices around peer review for open textbooks.

Below is a recap of the meeting. You can read next steps and how to get involved here.

Deb Quentel from CALI started the session by describing CALI’s editorial review process for the lessons and textbooks they produce. Deb said CALI has an editorial review board consisting of potential reviewers in specific subject areas that she reaches out to first when looking for reviewers. If no one has the relevant expertise, she asks board members to leverage their networks to find appropriate reviewers. If that fails, the author may suggest potential peers as reviewers. Finally, Deb scouts reviewers online from relevant websites and publications.

In CALI’s peer review process, reviewers are asked to look at subject matter accuracy and whether the content covers the terrain to be expected. Reviewers also evaluate the sophistication of the end-of-chapter questions that are included for students. Reviewers provide a no-more-than-two-page memo of feedback. At CALI, peer reviewers are anonymous and usually review one chapter of a text. About 75% of the chapters for any given book get reviewed. Deb outlines her process in further detail here.

Next, Hugh McGuire of Rebus Community outlined various types of pre- and post-publication review that he hypothesized may need to be done to an open textbook:

  • Subject matter expert review (a formal, pre-publication review, similar to traditional peer review)
  • Open review, in which anyone can make comments (less formal)
  • Student and faculty feedback on a published, beta version of the textbook
  • Ongoing feedback (how does feedback get back to the authors following publication?)
  • Revision and updates (especially for subjects that change frequently)

Karen Lauritsen from the Open Textbook Network gave an overview of OTN’s review process. All new OTN member organizations are able to send faculty to workshops as part of their professional development in open textbooks. In return, they are required to provide a light review for one book in the Open Textbook Library and are given a rubric from which to do so. Karen said that roughly 40% of these reviewers end up adopting a textbook from the library for classroom use.

The discussion then moved on to standardizing types of peer review processes for open textbooks, perhaps by using markers or badges to transparently delineate which processes were employed on a given text. Billy Meinke from the University of Hawaii shared the Mozilla Science Contributorship Badges and noted that ideally peer review badges would exist both for content and for contributors. This would serve the dual purpose of giving recognition to reviewers along with credit they can use in their tenure and promotion process.

Billy said that Mozilla Science Badges were linked to ORCID ids. Hugh said Rebus will be looking for ways to do the same. Karen added that the markers ought to be non-hierarchical, but still provide adequate recognition.

Nicholas Persa from UW-Madison acknowledged the need for one portal of access that enables and encourages community review – a model that Rebus is hoping to build.

Participants agreed on many topics, such as the need to incentivize reviewers either with payment or recognition, the need for post-publication review in classrooms and continual updating of open textbooks, and badges or markers to validate both content and reviewers. However, a number of questions remained unanswered: what specific value can we offer reviewers, particularly when monetary payment is not an option? Should pre-publication review be done before copyediting? How do we begin making these markers and defining levels of completion for peer review?

Universities such as The University of British Columbia seem to be making strides in recognizing the importance of OERs on tenure committees, and as this spreads to other institutions, there will be a growing need to develop best practices and standards for processes like reviewing.

The Rebus Working Group will continue to work on these and other issues pertaining to peer review. Next steps will be posted on the forum. Join the conversation on the Rebus Community forum thread as we try to figure it all out!

You can watch the video recap here.

Additional Resources:

Student Contributors Wanted: Guide to Making Open Textbooks With Students

At Rebus, we think one of the best ways to produce open textbooks is by involving students in the process.

That’s why we’re really excited about the handbook we have in development, A Guide to Making Open Textbooks With Students. The book is designed to help faculty find or create projects involving students in the creation of open textbooks or open resources.

The guide will contain:

  • an overview of open pedagogy – what it is, why it’s valuable, learning objectives and outcomes
  • resources and assignments for faculty wanting to adopt open pedagogy in their classrooms
  • case studies of projects in which faculty and students collaborated  to create open textbooks and similar open educational resources
  • student perspectives on their experiences working on such projects
  • tools you can use for open textbook projects, such as licensing guides, student agreements and more.

Currently our focus is on finding students who have worked on open textbook projects to write 300- to 500-word narratives about their experiences.

If you know of someone who has worked on such a project and might be willing to contribute such a sidebar, please sign up to the forum and reply to this post, or encourage them to do so. 

We also still welcome contributions from faculty, so if you have an idea for a resource that you can contribute, we’re all ears–reply here.

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Five More Chapter Authors Needed for Media Innovation & Entrepreneurship Open Textbook

One of the pilot open textbook projects the Rebus Community is supporting is Media Innovation & Entrepreneurship, designed to be used in media entrepreneurship courses or other journalism, mass communication or media courses in which media entrepreneurship is taught.

Each “chapter” of the book will be a module that can accompany a week’s lesson in a 15-week course. The work will be designed to be used as a whole, or as standalone modules.

We’ve been reaching out to chapter contributors for the past month or so, and are now only five chapters away from having every chapter in this open textbook project spoken for. Can you fill, or help us find someone to fill, the last major holes?  

The final topics in need of a chapter author are:

  • Ideation
  • Project Management Skills & Technologies
  • Human-centered Design
  • Competitive Analysis
  • UX/UI Testing and Iterating

If you can contribute (or have someone to suggest we reach out to), please sign up to the Rebus Community Forum and reply to this post.

After these chapters are claimed, we’ll be looking for professionals to contribute sidebars with firsthand experience and faculty to contribute classroom activities. A future edition will also include companion resources for instructors.

You can view the table of contents in development here and learn more about the project here.

Dr. Michelle Ferrier of Ohio University is the lead author on the project, with assistance from Rebus’ own Liz Mays, who is also a faculty associate at Arizona State University.

The project is planned for beta release and student use and testing in August 2017.

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June Office Hours: Accessibility in Open Textbooks

Monday, June 5, at 3 p.m. EST

Topic: Accessibility in Open Textbooks

Guest Speakers: Josie Gray, BCcampus; Jess Mitchell, OCAD University; Michelle Reed, University of Texas at Arlington Libraries; Krista Greear, University of Washington

What are the best practices to ensure accessibility in open textbooks? In this session, we will talk about methods to ensure accessibility during authoring and post-authoring processes. We’ll also discuss how to audit the accessibility of existing open textbooks.

RSVP for the session. Click https://zoom.us/j/274741128 to join the session day of. (Note that the session will be recorded.)

If you have any questions, or have difficulty entering the call, email us at contact@rebus.community.

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Open Pedagogy in Action: Antología Abierta de Literatura Hispánica

Are you a Spanish language literature professor looking for an open pedagogy project for your classroom? We’re looking for contributors to expand the Antología Abierta de Literatura Hispánica and you and your students could help! Read more about the project below, then head here to participate.


Here at the Rebus Community, we’ve found working with students to be one of the most interesting approaches to creating open textbooks out there.

This approach was the driving force behind the first iteration of our Open Anthology of Earlier American Literature project, which is now being expanded by lead editor Tim Robbins. Our January Office Hours session also discussed the issue, and from that session we began work on a guide to working with students on open textbooks.

We’re pleased to now add another great example of open pedagogy to our stable of projects, with the Antología Abierta de Literatura Hispánica (Open Anthology of Hispanic Literature, AALH) led by Julie Ward of the University of Oklahoma.

The AALH is a collection of public-domain texts from the Hispanic world, with critical introductions and annotations by undergraduate students in Julie’s Introduction to Hispanic Literature and Culture course at the University of Oklahoma. The AALH is intended as a freely accessible digital resource for students of Hispanic literature, and proposes an inclusive, broad, and evolving definition of the canon.

To continue Julie and her students’ work, we are looking for collaborators who will implement the critical edition assignment in their own courses and share the student-created critical editions for inclusion in future editions.

Resources will be offered to support the implementation, including:

  • Assignment brief
  • Marking rubric
  • Suggested assignment timeline
  • List of possible texts in public domain
  • Sample MOU for students
  • Guide to Creative Commons licensing for students
  • Community support from others running similar assignments

These resources are offered as a starting point only, and can be adapted to meet your course’s requirements.

If you are teaching a Hispanic literature course at any level and want to work with your students to expand the anthology, head to the project page in the forum, sign up, and let us know you’re interested!